Sunday, September 24, 2006

ASI is dead, long live Express!

That’s the message from PLX Technology which rolls out a 48-lane PCI Express switch today (Monday, Sept.25), its new top-of-the-line product aimed at high-end servers, graphics cards and embedded systems where Express is gaining traction.


In the wake of several companies pulling the plug on Advanced Switching Interconnect products and the demise of StarGen, the last ASI silicon provider, top comms and embedded OEMs are now migrating from PCI to Express, said Akber Kazmi, a senior marketing manager with PLX.

“The major comms OEMs have no choice but to move to Express now,” Kazmi said.

So when if ever will we hear an official announcement of the demise of ASI? The ASI and StarGen Web sites are still mum, and the former ASI chair is not returning my calls. They were once so eager to talk. --rbm

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

The ASI patient died due to malpractice by the primary care physician suffering from some form of split-brain disorder and the rest of the HMO called the ASI-SIG failing to get that doctor its much needed therapy sessions. It was poorly managed by the primary care physician who no matter how many drugs it took to convince itself the patient was still fine, the patient's vital signs continued to grow weaker and weaker. No number of marketing sessions at IDF, press interviews, proclamations from its execs about the changing face of communications - not too mention it would solve all server blade and storage solutions - could save this technology.

Don't get me wrong, some of the companies involved in the ASI-SIG created some good technology. But good technology isn't enough to win the day and if the physician is in trouble, it is time to look elsewhere which is what so many vendors did much to the demise of ASI itself.

Anonymous said...

The ASI patient died due to malpractice by the primary care physician suffering from some form of split-brain disorder and the rest of the HMO called the ASI-SIG failing to get that doctor its much needed therapy sessions. It was poorly managed by the primary care physician who no matter how many drugs it took to convince itself the patient was still fine, the patient's vital signs continued to grow weaker and weaker. No number of marketing sessions at IDF, press interviews, proclamations from its execs about the changing face of communications - not too mention it would solve all server blade and storage solutions - could save this technology.

Don't get me wrong, some of the companies involved in the ASI-SIG created some good technology. But good technology isn't enough to win the day and if the physician is in trouble, it is time to look elsewhere which is what so many vendors did much to the demise of ASI itself. When so many of the ASI proponents lost faith in technology, it was clear that it was time to call in the priest to deliver the last rites and put the technology to rest. Mourn not the death of the techonolgy so much as the survivors who have to pick up the pieces. May the Lord have mercy on their souls and help them learn that getting into bed with the devil often gets you burned while the devil moves on to the next bed.

interconnect Guy said...

Let's also remember that while the ASI -SIG website is still around.
Too look at all the reasons ASI told us that PCI-Express would not be able to handle Communications and data plane fabrics. ASI was the answer to all Express does not have!
Comm's OEM's have no choice but to move away from Express, with no future for the Applications that require Multiple CPU's/ DSP's, Reliability, Performance, and Scalability!

Anonymous said...

Comm's OEM can always use serial Rapid I/O which has many of the same PCIe switch vendors and such providing products. PCIe isn't a panacea. Tries to be too many things to too many markets so its specifications are getting more than a bit convoluted. It still will meet many needs but the notion of something simple fell away years ago and it continues to progress to an ever more complex rendition that is more difficult to implement, validate, and insure interoperability. Such is life.

 
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